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If you are new to catheterization, you may have questions. Here are some helpful articles.

 

 

What is a urinary catheter?

A urinary catheter is a medical device designed to help individuals manage their ability to urinate.  For someone who is unable to empty their bladder without assistance (a conditional called urinary retention), a catheter can be passed into the bladder to drain urine. [READ MORE] 

 

What is an indwelling catheter?

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are thin, flexible, hollow tubes made of latex or silicone, with a balloon on one end. After passing the catheter through the urethra and into the bladder, the balloon is inflated with a small amount of water to hold the catheter in place.  [READ MORE] 

 

What is an intermittent catheter?

Intermittent catheters are usually thin, flexible, hollow tubes made of silicone, rubber, latex or plastic. These types of catheters are inserted as needed to drain urine from the bladder into the toilet or into a disposable bag. For those with spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, enlarged prostate and other conditions that affect normal bladder function, an intermittent catheter may be used to manage emptying the bladder.  [READ MORE] 

 

What are condom catheters?

A condom, or external, catheter covers the penis like a condom. The tip of the catheter is attached to a tube that drains urine into a drainage bag. Condom catheters are often used to manage urinary incontinence.  [READ MORE]  

 

What are urinary tract infections?

When you have an infection in your urethra, kidneys or bladder, it is called a urinary tract infection (UTI). While urinary tract infections are common, they can pose a serious health risk that may require medical treatment. [READ MORE]  

 

Common questions and answers about urinary catheters

For people who need help emptying their bladder (urinary retention) or who experience accidental urine loss (incontinence), your doctor may recommend using a urinary catheter. Catheters are often used to manage bladder control in individuals with nerve injuries to the brain, spinal cord or bladder, those with multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, enlarged prostate and other conditions that affect normal bladder function.  [READ MORE] 

 

Clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) for women

Your doctor may recommend using intermittent catheters to empty your bladder. These catheters are designed to be inserted at various times in the day. (Other kinds of catheters, such as indwelling, also known as Foley, remain in the bladder all the time.) According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), you’ll need to self-catheterize “at least every six hours and at bedtime.” [READ MORE] 

 

Clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) for men

Your doctor may recommend using intermittent catheters to empty your bladder. These catheters are designed to be inserted at various times in the day. (Other kinds of catheters, such as indwelling, also known as Foley, remain in the bladder all the time.). According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), you’ll need to self-catheterize “at least every six hours and at bedtime.” Please consult your doctor on how often you should catheterize. [READ MORE] 

 

Urinary catheter choices for women

A female urinary catheter is a thin, flexible, plastic tube used to drain urine from the bladder. It comes in a variety of sizes, styles and materials. Typically, women and children use shorter-length catheters, while men tend to use longer-length ones. The two most common types of female catheters are intermittent and indwelling. [READ MORE]

 

Urinary catheter choices for men

Male urinary catheters are commonly used to manage emptying the bladder. They can help individuals deal with urinary retention, urinary incontinence and other urinary issues that may develop after surgery. Intermittent and indwelling catheters are typically used for either men or women, but condom catheters are made exclusively for men.  [READ MORE]