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Urinary catheter choices for men

Male urinary catheters are commonly used to manage emptying the bladder. They can help individuals deal with urinary retention, urinary incontinence and other urinary issues that may develop after surgery. Intermittent and indwelling catheters are typically used for either men or women, but condom catheters are made exclusively for men.

 

Intermittent catheters

Intermittent catheters are commonly used when you are capable of inserting the catheter yourself. These catheters are used to empty your bladder at certain times throughout the day, as directed by your doctor. The slightly curved tip of a coudé tip intermittent catheter is often recommended for men who need to navigate past an enlarged prostate, urethral stricture or other obstruction. A health care professional will teach you how to self-catheterize so you can use the catheters at home. Note: There is a lower incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI) with the use of intermittent catheters, when compared with other choices, such as indwelling catheters.

 

Indwelling (Foley) catheters

An indwelling catheter (commonly known as Foley) can be used if you are not capable of inserting an intermittent catheter. An indwelling catheter drains urine from the bladder into a drainage bag strapped to your leg or to the bed. After inserting the indwelling catheter, a small balloon at the catheter’s inserted tip is inflated inside the bladder to prevent the catheter from sliding out of the body. Indwelling catheters are considered long-term catheters and must be changed once a month. Usually a health care professional inserts and removes an indwelling catheter.

 

Male external catheters

A male external catheter, also called a condom catheter, is often a convenient option because it doesn’t require insertion into the urethra. Instead, it is placed over the penis like a condom and connected to a drainage bag. It is a non-invasive solution for men without urinary retention issues.

Note: While these are the most common types of catheters, there are other types that your health care provider may recommend based on your individual needs.

 

Specialty medical devices for men

For managing urine output, Edgepark offers incontinence pumps, which utilize non-invasive, sensor-driven technology that pulls urine away from the body.

Along with an extensive selection of catheters and incontinence products, Edgepark also carries impotence/ED pumps. These vacuum pump systems may help impotent men achieve an erection without drugs, injections or surgery. They are available in manual or battery-operated versions for those with limited hand function.

 

 

Related articles:
Common questions and answers about urinary catheters
Clean intermittent self-catheterization for men
Catheters and health care coverage
 
SOURCES
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000140.htm
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003981.htm