What types of feeding tubes are available?

People who are unable to eat food normally can receive the nutrition they need through a feeding tube. Receiving food through a tube is called enteral nutrition.

Feeding tubes come in a variety of options. Your doctor will determine the type of tube you need based on several factors, including your medical condition and the insertion point for the feeding tube. (Medication can also be administered through the feeding tube.)

In general, these are the types of feeding tubes that are used to provide enteral nutrition:

 

 

Non-surgically inserted tubes

These feeding tubes are inserted in through the nose, down the esophagus and either into the stomach or the small intestine.

  • Short-term feeding option, usually 4-6 weeks
  • Easier to insert
  • Most common type of feeding tubes

Type of Tube

Insertion Point

Ending Point

Orogastric tube (OG)

Mouth

Stomach

 

Nasogastric tube (NG)

 

Nose

Stomach

Nasoduodenal tube

 

Nose

Top of the intestine (duodenum)

Nasojejunal tube

 

Nose

Middle section of the intestine (jejunum)

 

Surgically inserted tubes

These feeding tubes are inserted into the stomach or the small intestine through a surgical procedure.

  • More invasive procedure for initial insertion
  • Usually for a long-term feeding option

Type of Tube

Insertion Point

Ending Point

Gastrostomy tube (G-tube)

 

Abdominal wall

 

Stomach

Jejunostomy tube (J-tube)

 

Abdominal wall

Small intestine (ends in the jejunum)

Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy/Jejunostomy tube (PEG/PEJ tube)

 

Abdominal wall (inserted by an endoscopic procedure)

Stomach and small intestine

 

 

Related articles:
What is enteral nutrition?
How does a feeding tube work?
Commonly asked questions about nutrition & enteral feeding
 
SOURCES
www.dietitian.org/d_cvd/docs/kc_enteral_feeding.pdf